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Chordeumatida species

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The gonopod drawings on this page are by W.A. Shear (Hampden-Sydney College, Hampden-Sydney, Virginia, USA) and are used here with his permission. Abbreviations in drawings: AG = anterior gonopods, PG = posterior gonopods, L10 = legpair 10, av = anterior view, pv = posterior view.


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Australeuma jeekeli Golovatch, 1986

jeekeli

This mainly eastern species rarely grows longer than 10 mm but is sometimes locally abundant. It is readily pitfall-trapped, and pitfall data from native forest show a strong peak in surface activity for A. jeekeli in early summer. All-gray forms (no contrasting colour on paranota) seem to be most common at the extremities of the A. jeekeli range, but the colour forms have not yet been carefully mapped. A. jeekeli occurs in a wide range of forest habitats. It survives clearfelling and burning of wet forest and is found in Pinus radiata plantations

Bonham et al. (2002), Golovatch (1986), Mesibov (1997b, 1998b, 2000), Mesibov et al. (1995), Shear and Mesibov (1997) 


Tasmania mapjeekeli      gonopodsjeekeli

Australeuma simile Golovatch, 1986

simile

Over much of the A. simile range in western Tasmania, the dark brown colouring shown in the image above is only present on the tips of the paranota and at the bases of the long dorsal setae, and to the naked eye the animal is uniformly pale yellow. This species grows to ca 12 mm long and is locally abundant in wet forest, and also thrives in buttongrass moorland in the Southwest. I have found large populations in eucalypt plantations in northwest Tasmania.

Bonham et al. (2002), Golovatch (1986), Mesibov (1993b, 1998b) 


Tasmania mapsimile      gonopodssimile

the Australeuma mauriesi group

mauriesi

There are at least two species in this group. All forms have a striking colour pattern and paranota deflected downwards at roughly 45° from the horizontal. Species can only be positively identified by dissection and close examination of the male gonopods. Australeuma in this group seem to be most abundant in wet forest at intermediate elevations (ca 600-1000 m).

Mesibov (1998b), Shear and Mesibov (1997)


Tasmania mapgolovatchi      gonopodsgolovatchi

Australeuma golovatchi Shear and Mesibov, 1997 


Tasmania mapmauriesi      gonopodsmauriesi

Australeuma mauriesi Shear and Mesibov, 1997


Nesiothrix species

Nesiothrix

Nesiothrix medialis (left) and N. tasmanica (right)

These very inconspicuous, pale chordeumatidans grow to ca 8 mm long and are mainly found mainly in wet forest at lower elevations. Nesiothrix medialis is abundant in the Southern Forests, including eucalypt regrowth arising from clearfall-and-burn silviculture. N. tasmanica is the most widespread Nesiothrix species; southeastern specimens are often prominently banded (image above right). N. mangana is so far known only from Mt Mangana on Bruny Island but is likely to have been overlooked elsewhere. A fourth, undescribed Nesiothrix is restricted to the Northwest and is abundant in Pinus radiata plantations.

Bonham et al. (2002), Golovatch (1986), Mesibov (1997b), Shear and Mesibov (1997)


Tasmania mapmangana      gonopodsmangana

Nesiothrix mangana Shear and Mesibov, 1997


Tasmania mapmedialis      gonopodsmedialis

Nesiothrix medialis Shear and Mesibov, 1997 


Tasmania maptasmanica      gonopodstasmanica

Nesiothrix tasmanica (Golovatch, 1986)


Reginaterreuma tarkinensis Shear and Mesibov, 1995

tarkinense

This species is Tasmania's largest chordeumatidan and can grow to nearly 20 mm in length. It is a conspicuous, fast-running millipede and can be remarkably abundant in lowland Nothofagus forest in the Northwest. In the eastern portion of its range R. tarkinensis has been found in Pinus radiata plantations.

Bonham et al. (2002), Mesibov (1993b (in error as 'peterjohnsiid sp.'), 1998b), Shear and Mesibov (1995) 


Tasmania maptarkinense      gonopodstarkinense

Neocambrisoma species

Neocambrisoma

The three known species of Tasmanian Neocambrisoma can be very hard to distinguish from Peterjohnsia titan and from each other, and positive identifications can only be made by dissecting out and examining the gonopods of mature males. In both genera adults reach 7-8 mm in length.

Neocambrisoma in Tasmania is a wet-forest genus. N. cachinnus only seems to be common at higher elevations (600+ m), and N. fieldensis has so far only been found in Mt Field National Park. A third, undescribed Neocambrisoma occurs in the Southeast.

Bonham et al. (2002), Shear and Mesibov (1997)


Tasmania mapcachinnus      gonopodscachinnus

Neocambrisoma cachinnus Shear and Mesibov, 1997 


Tasmania mapfieldensis      gonopodsfieldensis

Neocambrisoma fieldensis Shear and Mesibov, 1997


Peterjohnsia titan Shear and Mesibov, 1994

titan

This widespread chordeumatidan can be very hard to distinguish from Neocambrisoma species, and positive identification can only be made by dissecting and examining the gonopods of mature males. In both genera adults reach 7-8 mm in length. P. titan occurs in a wide range of forest types and has also been found in Pinus radiata plantations.

Bonham et al. (2002), Mesibov et al. (1995), Shear and Mesibov (1994, 1997)


Tasmania maptitan      gonopodstitan